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Link: linnaeus.c18.net/Letter/L0286 • Peter Collinson to Carl Linnaeus, 24 May 1739 n.s.
Dated May 13: 1739. Sent from London (Great Britain) to Stockholm (Sweden). Written in English.

May 13: 1739

Dear Fr[iend]

I could not Omitt so convenient an Opportunity By my Worthy Friend Docr FilleniusFilenius, Peter (1704-1780).
Swedish. Bishop of Linköping.
Studied in England, professor of
Oriental languages at Lund.
to Inquire after your Welfare and Give you Joy on Your Marriage. May Much Happyness attend You in that State.

I am Glad of this conveyance to Express my Gratitude for the particular regard Shown Mee, in that Curious Elaborate Work the Horts Clifforts.[1] Something I think was Due to Mee from the CommonWealth of Botany; for the Great Number of Plants & Seeds I have Annually procur’d from Abroad and You have been so Good to pay It By Giveing Mee a Species of Eternity (Botanically Speaking). That is [a][a] : MS1 [added above the line] a name[a][a] : MS1 [added above the line] as long as Men and Books Endure. This layes Mee under Great Obligations, which I shall never Forgett.

I am concern’d I can make no better Acknowledgsments then by the Small token of Pensilvanian Ores, which the Bearer will Deliver to You.

My Best Wishes Attend You and if I can any ways Serve You Here You May be Assured of the Readiness of Your Sincere & Affectionate Friend

Peter Collinson

[address] To Docr Linnaeus / Upsal

upSUMMARY

Peter Collinson uses an opportunity to send Linnaeus a letter through Peter Filenius. He asks how Linnaeus is and congratulates Linnaeus on his marriage.

Collinson thanks Linnaeus for the attention Linnaeus had paid him in Hortus Cliffortianus. Collinson admits that he was worth something, since he had been so active in procuring seeds and plants from abroad. Linnaeus has given him eternal honour by naming a species after him, and Collinson is very obliged to Linnaeus for this.

Collinson is sorry that he only has one token of his gratitude, a sample of Pennsylvania ores, which the bearer of the letter will deliver to Linnaeus.

Collinson assures Linnaeus that he will always be ready to serve him from London in any way that he can.

P.S. Collinson assumes that Johan Frederik Gronovius has already sent Linnaeus James Logan’s two treatises in Latin, published in Holland. He also asks Linnaeus to send him a letter when there is an opportunity.

upMANUSCRIPTS

a. original holograph (LS, XVII, 1-2). b. contemporary copy (BL, Ms 28545, 140). [1] [2] [1] [2] [3]

upEDITIONS

1. A selection (1821), vol. 1, p. 5-6   p.5  p.6.
2. “Forget not Mee & My Garden ...” (2002), p. 72-74 .

upTEXTUAL NOTES

a.
MS1 [added above the line]
b.
MS1 [added in the left margin; there is no indication where it should be inserted]

upEXPLANATORY NOTES

1.
Peter Collinson refers to the description and illustration of the plant, “Collinsonia”, named after him, in Linnaeus, Hortus CliffortianusLinnaeus, Carl Hortus
Cliffortianus, plantas exhibens quas in
hortis tam vivis quam siccis Hartecampi
in Hollandia coluit [...] Georgius
Clifford
(Amsterdam 1737). Soulsby
no. 328.
, 14, Sp. 1 and Tab. V.
2.
Logan, Experimenta et meletemata de plantarum generationeLogan, James Experimenta et
meletemata de plantarum generatione

(Leiden 1739); repr. in, The
Scientific papers of James Logan
,
ed. R. N. Lokken, Transactions of the
American Philosophical Society, new
series 62:6 (1972), 81-84.
(1739) was published in Leiden by Johan Frederik Gronovius. It was republished in London and translated into English by John FothergillFothergill, John (1712-1780).
British. Physician and collector of
natural history objects. Studied in
Holland, France and Germany. His cabinet
of zoological and mineralogical
specimens as well as his botanical
garden at Upton were well known.
Correspondent of Linnaeus.
, Experiments and considerations on the generation of plantsLogan, James Experiments and
considerations on the generation of
plants
(London 1747); repr. in,
The Scientific papers of James
Logan
, ed. R. N. Lokken,
Transactions of the American
Philosophical Society, new series 62:6
(1972), 84-88.
(1747). This work was an enlarged version of Logan, “Some experiments concerning the impregnation of the seeds of plants”Logan, James “Some experiments
concerning the impregnation of the seeds
of plants”, Philosophical
Transactions
, 39, no. 440 (1736),
192-195, repr. in The Scientific
papers of James Logan
, ed. R. N.
Lokken, Transactions of the American
Philosophical Society, new series 62:6
(1972), 79-80.
, 192-195. The other Latin treatise was Logan, Canonum pro inveniendis refractionumLogan, James Canonum pro
inveniendis refractionum, tum
simplicium, tum in lentibus duplicium
focis, demonstrationes geometricae

(Leiden 1739).
(1739). An English version, The Principal rules in dioptricsLogan, James “The principal
rules in dioptrics, for finding the foci
of glasses demonstrated both by
analysis, and by geometrical
construction”, The Scientific papers
of James Logan
, ed. R. N. Lokken,
Transactions of the American
Philosophical Society, new series 62:6
(1972), 39-46.
, was published in Lokken, “The scientific papers of James Logan”Logan, James The Scientific
papers of James Logan
, ed. R. N.
Lokken, Transactions of the American
Philosophical Society, new series 62:6
(1972).
, 39-46.