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Link: linnaeus.c18.net/Letter/L0840 • Peter Collinson to Carl Linnaeus, 6 November 1747 n.s.
Dated Octobr 26th 1747. Sent from London (Great Britain) to Uppsala (Sweden). Written in English.

upSUMMARY

Peter CollinsonCollinson, Peter (1694-1768).
British. Merchant and amateur naturalist
in London, corresponded with many
scientists. Correspondent of Linnaeus.
sends Linnaeus a letter through Linnaeus’s student of theology [Johan SandinSandin, Johan (?-1748).
Swedish. Clergyman in New Jersey.
Husband of Anna Margareta Sandin in her
first marriage.
] who came to see him. Collinson will do him all the service he can.

Collinson is very honoured by being nominated a member of [“your Learned Royal Society”, i.e.the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences [Kungliga Svenska VetenskapsakademienKungliga Svenska Vetenskapsakademien,
Swedish. The Royal Swedish
Academy of Sciences, Stockholm. Founded
in 1739.
, where Collinson was elected a member in 1747]. He feels he does not deserve it but will try to live up to it.

Collinson has sent Linnaeus James Logan’sLogan, James (1674-1751).
American. Governor of
Pennsylvania.William Penn´s
secretary. Amateur naturalist and
scientist. Published works on astronomy,
botany and optics. Correspondent of
Linnaeus.
treatise about the operation of the farina on maize [Collinson refers to Logan’s Experimenta et meletemata de plantarum generationeLogan, James Experimenta et
meletemata de plantarum generatione

(Leiden 1739); repr. in, The
Scientific papers of James Logan
,
ed. R. N. Lokken, Transactions of the
American Philosophical Society, new
series 62:6 (1972), 81-84.
, published in 1739 with the assistence of Johan Frederik GronoviusGronovius, Johan Frederik
(1690-1762). Dutch. Naturalist, senator
of Leiden. Linnaeus’s benefactor and
friend. Published Flora Virginica
(1743, 1762) together with John Clayton.
Correspondent of Linnaeus.
, originally communicated to the Royal Society, LondonRoyal Society, London,
British. The Royal Society was founded
in Oxford in 1645 and sanctioned as a
royal society in 1662.
as a preliminary essay, “Some experiments concerning the impregnation of the seeds of plants”Logan, James “Some experiments
concerning the impregnation of the seeds
of plants”, Philosophical
Transactions
, 39, no. 440 (1736),
192-195, repr. in The Scientific
papers of James Logan
, ed. R. N.
Lokken, Transactions of the American
Philosophical Society, new series 62:6
(1972), 79-80.
, and translated into English by John FothergillFothergill, John (1712-1780).
British. Physician and collector of
natural history objects. Studied in
Holland, France and Germany. His cabinet
of zoological and mineralogical
specimens as well as his botanical
garden at Upton were well known.
Correspondent of Linnaeus.
, Experiments and considerations on the generation of plantsLogan, James Experiments and
considerations on the generation of
plants
(London 1747); repr. in,
The Scientific papers of James
Logan
, ed. R. N. Lokken,
Transactions of the American
Philosophical Society, new series 62:6
(1972), 84-88.
]. It is written in Latin and suitable for reading at a meeting of the Academy.

Cadwallader Colden’sColden, Cadwallader
(1688-1776). American. Physician of
Scottish origin, botanist, physicist,
politician. Lieutenant governor of New
York. Correspondent of Linnaeus.
treatise on gravitation is a new system [Collinson refers to Colden’s, An explication of the first causes of action in matterColden, Cadwallader An
explication of the first causes of
action in matter : and of the cause of
gravitation
(New York & London,
1745).
], which Colden wants to have thoroughly examined. Collinson regrets it is written in English and not in Latin, but he is aware that several scholars in Sweden understand English so he hopes it is acceptable. Linnaeus should give the Academy a copy of each of these books in Collinson’s name, and Collinson will send more as soon as he can. Tobias BjörkBjörk, Tobias (1704-1778).
Swedish. Clergyman. Minister of the
Swedish Church in London in 1735. In
1752 dean of Norrbärke, Dalecarlia.
had given them to a captain who was to sail a week ago.

Collinson thanks Linnaeus for several treatises that he has received, especially for Hortus UpsaliensisLinnaeus, Carl Hortus
Upsaliensis
, resp. S. Nauclér
(Upsala, 1745). Soulsby no. 1424.
. Collinson hopes to send Linnaeus some seeds, but Linnaeus should arrange to receive them very soon so that they do not lie undelivered for a year. Collinson will send a pot with a root of Collinsonia by the first ship next spring

Collinson thanks Linnaeus also for Nova plantarum genera, quae [...] praesidie [...] Carolo LinnaeoLinnaeus, Carl Nova plantarum
genera, quae [...] praesidie [...]
Carolo Linnaeo
, diss., resp. C. M.
Dassow (Uppsala, 1747). Soulsby no.
1469.
and he wishes Linnaeus had sent two more copies, one for John BartramBartram, John (1701-1777).
American. Botanist living in
Pennsylvania and Delaware. Father of
John Bartram the Younger and William
Bartram. Correspondent of Linnaeus.
and the other for Colden. Collinson knows they would have been pleased. He also thanks Linnaeus for the copy of Flora ZeylanicaLinnaeus, Carl Flora
Zeylanica; sistens plantas Indicas
Zeylonae insulae, quae olim 1670-1677,
lectae fuere a Paulo Hermanno [...]
demum post 70 annos ab Augusto
Günthero [...] orbi redditae

(Stockholm,1747). Soulsby no. 420.
. The seeds Collinson had intended to send are not yet delivered.

P.S. 1. He thanks Linnaeus for seeds, which will give him several curious plants in his garden.

P. S. 2. Johann Jacob DilleniusDillenius, Johann Jacob
(1684-1747). German/British. Studied at
Giessen. Sherardian professor of botany
at Oxford. Correspondent of Linnaeus.
was working at the Pinax when he died [Collinson refers to Dillenius’s work with publishing a continuation of Caspar Bauhin’sBauhin, Caspar (1560-1624).
Swiss. Botanist and physician, Basle.
Bauhin’s Prodromus and Pinax
theatri botanici
(1620, 1623, 1671)
were important works in the field of
botanical nomenclature.
, Pinax theatri botaniciBauhin, Caspar Pinax theatri
botanici sive index in Theophrasti
Dioscoridis, Plinii et botanicorum qui a
seculo scripserunt opera plantarum
circiter sex milium ab ipsis exhibitarum
nomina cum earundem synonymiis &
differentiis methodice secundum genera
& species proponens
(1623) 2 ed.
(Basle 1671).
, the enlarged edition of Pinax theatri botaniciBauhin, Caspar Pinax theatri
botanici Caspari Bauhini [...] sive
index in Theophrasti, Dioscoridis,
Plinii et botanicorum qui a seculo
scripserunt opera; plantarum circiter
sex millium ab ipsis exhibitarum nomina
cum earundem synonymiis &
differentiis methodice secundum earum
& genera & species proponens.
Opus XL annorum hactenus non editum
summopere expetitum & ad auctores
intelligendos plurimum faciens

(Basle 1623).
from 1623], which he never finished], Collinson does not think his successor [Humphrey SibthorpSibthorp, Humphrey (1713-1797).
British. Succeeded Johann Jacob
Dillenius as Sherardian professor of
botany at Oxford. Father of John
Sibthorp. Correspondent of Linnaeus.
] will be able to continue the work.

Collinson has eaten the flesh of North American bear several times, and he thinks it is most agreeable. His friend, a merchant [unidentified], had had young bears brought to England every year and fattened them to make the flesh delightful, with fat whiter and finer than lambs’ fat.

John Mitchell’sMitchell, John (1711-1768).
British/American. Physician and
botanist. Born in Virginia. After
studies in medicine at the University of
Edinburgh he returned to Virginia as a
physician, but left America for London
in 1746. Famous for his map of eastern
North-America, known as the Mitchell
Map, first published in 1755.
Correspondent of Linnaeus.
system will be published by Christopher Jacob TrewTrew, Christopher Jacob
(1695-1769). German. Botanist,
physician and counsellor of the margrave
of Ansbach.
in Nuremberg in a work called “Ephemeridum Caesar” [Collinson refers to ”D.D. Jo. Mitchell Dissertatio brevis de principiis botanicorum et zoologorum”Mitchell, John ”D.D. Jo.
Mitchell Dissertatio brevis de
principiis botanicorum et zoologorum
deque novo stabiliendo naturae rerum
congruo, cum appendice aliquot generum
plantarum recens conditorum”, in
"Appendix", in Acta
Physico-Medica Academiae Caesare
Leopoldino-Franciscanae naturae
curiosorum exhibentia Ephemerides
, 8
(1748), 187-224.
].

Collinson asks if Linnaeus has seen Rudiger’s [Johann Elias Ridinger’sRidinger, Johann Elias
(1698-1767). German. Painter, engraver
and publisher, who settled in Augsburg
and Regensburg. Famous for his
collections of copparplate engravings
depicting animal and hunting scenes.
] curious prints of beasts, published in Nuremberg.

Collinson informs Linnaeus that a letter enclosed in another letter with a cover takes double postage in England, while letters written on the same sheet of paper pay single postage.

Collinson’s garden is very beautiful, for there has been no frost, a long and dry summer and autumn. The grapes are very ripe, and there is very good profit in wine-making this year in England.

Hans SloaneSloane, Hans (1660-1753).
British. Physician, naturalist and
collector. Secretary of the Royal
Society in 1693, president in 1727.
Sloane’s collections of natural history
objects were donated to the English
nation and were one of cornerstones of
the British Museum (1759). Correspondent
of Linnaeus.
is hearty, and Philip MillerMiller, Philip (1691-1771).
British. Gardener of the Chelsea Physic
Garden. Corresponded with many
botanists. His rich herbarium was sold
to Joseph Banks. Correspondent of
Linnaeus.
is well.

Letter L6094 from John Mitchell to Linnaeus is written on the margins of the sheet.

upMANUSCRIPTS

a. original holograph (LS, XVII, 21-21v, 22v). [1] [2] [3]

upEDITIONS

1. A selection (1821), vol. 1, p. 19-21   p.19  p.20  p.21.
2. “Forget not Mee & My Garden ...” (2002), p. 142-143 .