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C18

Link: linnaeus.c18.net/Letter/L3431 • Johan Peter Falck to Carl Linnaeus, 27 August 1764 n.s.
Dated 27 Aug. 1764. Sent from St Petersburg (Russia) to (). Written in Swedish.

upSUMMARY

Johan Peter FalckFalck, Johan Peter (1732-1774).
Swedish. Professor of botany and
curator of the botanical garden of St
Petersburg. Correspondent of Linnaeus.
has given Jonas SynnerbergSynnerberg, Jonas (-1775).
Swedish. Pharmacist, Åbo.
the following material to be taken by sea to Stockholm and delivered to Linnaeus at his earliest convenience. A small wooden box, that is not sealed for the sake of the customs, containing Siberian minerals from Pavel Grigorevich DemidovDemidov, Pavel Grigorevich
(1738-1821). Russian. Linnaeus´s
student. Brother of Alexandr Grigorevich
Demidov and Petr Grigorevich Demidov.
Son of Georgij Akinfievich Demidov and
grandson of Akinfiy Nikitich Demidov. He
created a natural history museum in
Moscow which was later given to the
University of Moscow. Correspondent of
Linnaeus.
, and a stick of the lace-bark tree from Johann Jacob LercheLerche, Johann Jacob
(1703-1780). German. Naturalist.
Military physician in Russian service at
Astrakan. Travelled in Persia.
Correspondent of Linnaeus.
, and finally a packet with seeds left over from the spring [sowing] material from Astrakhan and Siberia is to be awaited. Living material of Andromeda calyculata is also enclosed, and in the same pot also an Artemisia and a small rhizome of Pulmonaria Sibirica. However, the gardener dug up the wrong Pulmonaria. The Pulmonaria Falck intended was located beside this, which had more coarse leaves and was not so fragrant. The right one will be sent next summer, if he is still alive.

Falck has seen the Medical Garden. Nothing special is to be found there, at least regarding Siberian plants with the exception of Amethystea caerulea and Spiraea crenata. In the Orangery there are a lot of trees of Coffea, to what use he does not know. There are also some African Gerania, caper Capparis spinosa, and some other common orangery plants. The Apothecary or “Provisor” keeps the garden for Collegium Medicum to obtain pressed juices, distilled [filtered] water and specific dry medical-herbs. Falck is spiteful to learn that Aegopodium was named Archangelica. Conium grew in the ponds and Melampyrum nemorosum was definitely a Parietaria. Falck hastily visited the Botanic Garden once before but has thoroughly examined it now. He can report the following species: Chrysocoma biflora with and without ray-florets, Robinia pygmaea, Statice tatarica, Astragalus galegiformis, Crepis Sibirica, Salvia nemorosa, Veronica spuria, Hypericum ascyrum and Hieracium according to Johann Georg Gmelin’sGmelin, Johann Georg
(1709-1755). German. Voyager, botanist
and chemist. At the initiative of
empress Anna of Russia he spent ten
years (1733-1743) exploring Siberia. In
1749 he became professor of botany and
chemistry at Tübingen. Together
with his nephew Samuel Gottlieb he wrote
Flora Sibirica (1747-1769).
Correspondent of Linnaeus.
, Flora SibiricaGmelin, Johann Georg Flora
Sibirica, sive Historia plantarum
Sibiriae
(St Petersburg 1747-1769).
, vol. II. Falck considers it most curious that the plants can reach such great height on this sandy ground so that one can hardly recognize them. The garden is somewhat sloping and moist enough to be covered on the open ground by mosses, Brya, and liverworts, Marchantia polymorpha. In the last letter Falck could not determine the plants in class Syngenesia, which were in a sterile stage. But now he has examined them to Carduus nutans, Serratula coronata and Coreopsis tripteris.

Falck has no other particular news to forward to Linnaeus. The most depressing news, he received from newspapers from Hamburg, which reported the tragic death of Pehr ForsskålForsskål, Peter
(1732-1763). Swedish. Naturalist and
explorer. Linnaeus’s student, professor
in Denmark in 1759. Joined a Danish
expedition to Egypt and Arabia in 1761.
Died at Jerîm, Arabia.
Correspondent of Linnaeus.
. Falck grieved the loss of his friend and possible benefactor so much that it made him ill. Some weeks ago one of the Demidov brothers married. It was Petr Grigorevich DemidovDemidov, Petr Grigorevich
(1740-1826). Russian. Linnaeus´s
student. Brother of Alexandr Grigorevich
Demidov and Pavel Grigorevich Demidov.
Son of Georgij Akinfievich Demidov and
grandson of Akinfiy Nikitich Demidov.
, the youngest [the others were Alexandr Grigorevich DemidovDemidov, Alexandr Grigorevich
(1737-1803). Russian. Linnaeus´s
student. Brother of Pavel Grigorevich
Demidov and Petr Grigorevich Demidov.
Son of Georgij Akinfievich Demidov,
grandson of Akinfiy Nikitich Demidov.
and Pavel Grigorevich DemidovDemidov, Pavel Grigorevich
(1738-1821). Russian. Linnaeus´s
student. Brother of Alexandr Grigorevich
Demidov and Petr Grigorevich Demidov.
Son of Georgij Akinfievich Demidov and
grandson of Akinfiy Nikitich Demidov. He
created a natural history museum in
Moscow which was later given to the
University of Moscow. Correspondent of
Linnaeus.
] according to Falck.

Falck pays his deepest respect to Linnaeus’s wife [Sara Elisabet LinnaeaMoraea, Sara Elisabet
(1716-1806). Swedish. Linnaeus’s wife.
Daughter of Johan Moraeus and Elisabet
Hansdotter Moraea. Mother of Carl
Linnaeus the Younger and of Elisabeth
Christina, Louisa, Sara Christina and
Sophia Linnaea.
], the young daughters [Elisabeth Christina LinnaeaLinnaea, Sara Christina
(1751-1835). Swedish. Daughter of Carl
Linnaeus and Sara Elisabet Linnaea.
Sister of Carl Linnaeus the Younger and
of Elisabeth Christina, Louisa and
Sophia Linnaea.
, Louisa LinnaeaLinnaea, Louisa (1749-1839).
Swedish. Daughter of Carl Linnaeus and
Sara Elisabet Linnaea. Sister of Carl
Linnaeus the Younger and of Elisabeth
Christina, Sara Christina and Sophia
Linnaea.
, Sara Christina LinnaeaLinnaea, Sara Christina
(1751-1835). Swedish. Daughter of Carl
Linnaeus and Sara Elisabet Linnaea.
Sister of Carl Linnaeus the Younger and
of Elisabeth Christina, Louisa and
Sophia Linnaea.
, Sophia LinnaeaLinnaea, Sophia (1757-1830).
Swedish. Daughter of Carl Linnaeus and
Sara Elisabet Linnaea. Sister of Carl
Linnaeus the Younger and of Elisabeth
Christina, Louisa and Sara Christina
Linnaea. Wife of Samuel Christoffer
Duse.
] and to Linnaeus.

P.S. David de GorterGorter, David de (1707 or
1717-1783). Dutch. Botanist and
physician. Succeeded his father Johannes
de Gorter as physician-in-ordinary to
the Empress Elizabeth of Russia. Son of
Susanna de Gorter, brother of Herman
Boerhaave de Gorter. Correspondent of
Linnaeus.
the Physician-in-ordinary will leave for Sweden as soon as possible. He is eager to pay Linnaeus his respects. However, there are some problems with Gorter’s pension. It is not authorized yet in spite of the assurance to Gorter and his late father. Falck also reports on a newly released Appendix to Gorter’s Flora IngricaGorter, David de Flora
Ingrica ex schedis S. Krascheninnikow
confecta et propriis observationibus
aucta
(St. Petersburg 1761[-1764]).
and that he has been fortunate enough to speak with Gorter a few times this summer. Finally, Falck asks Linnaeus, most respectfully, to forward the things enclosed to their rightful owner.

upMANUSCRIPTS

a. (LS, IV, 119-120). [1] [2] [3]

upEDITIONS

1. Bref och skrifvelser (1912), vol. I:6, p. 43-45   p.43  p.44  p.45.