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C18

Link: linnaeus.c18.net/Letter/L3748 • Johan Peter Falck to Carl Linnaeus, 30 May 1766 n.s.
Dated 30 Maji 1766. Sent from St Petersburg (Russia) to (). Written in Swedish.

upSUMMARY

Johan Peter FalckFalck, Johan Peter (1732-1774).
Swedish. Professor of botany and
curator of the botanical garden of St
Petersburg. Correspondent of Linnaeus.
does not know what strange fate governs the mail between Sweden and Russia. About a fortnight ago Falck received a letter from Linnaeus, who had enclosed many seeds from rare plants for Falck’s garden. The garden depends on donations from various sources, but it is not certain that the garden ever will be able to compete with gardens located in a better climate. Falck considers Uppsala closer to Cape of Good Hope in comparison with the climate in St Petersburg.

Together with this letter, there will be three pots with plants of Acer tataricum, Amygdalus nana, Spiraea sorbifolia, which hopefully will reach their destination safely. The stones [“seeds”] brought to Linnaeus by Hoppius were from Amygdalus nana, and its fruits were ripening in the garden at the time. Falck had sown a whole bed with such stones last autumn. This spring the whole bed is full of sprouting plantlings.The woolly seeds do not belong to Typha, but to Anemone sylvatica as Falck told Linnaeus in the last letter. For confirmation Falck sends the plant itself and will eagerly wait for Linnaeus opinion.

It has not been possible to locate Hypecoum erectum in the Imperial Academy Garden yet. Falck is convinced that this plant has never been in his garden [the Medical Garden].

Cimicifuga is located in the Academy Garden; it has flowered several times there. The gardener has told Falck that it has never had well-developed anthers and that he never got seeds from it. Falck also heard the same from Joseph Gottlieb KolreuterKolreuter, Joseph Gottlieb
(1733-1806). German. Botanist,
published a pioneering work on plant
hybridization.
or was it someone else. He considers it most interesting that Erik LaxmanLaxman, Erik (1738-1796).
Swedish. Lutheran pastor at the
Kolyvanian mines and ironworks in
Siberia. Professor and councellor of the
Russian Board of Mines, St Peterburg.
Correspondent of Linnaeus.
did not observe this condition on all the specimens that he examined in Siberia.

Falck humbly asks for seeds of Fumaria spectabilis and of any other Siberian plant collected by Laxmann. He cannot understand why Laxmann has not sent him a single seed despite those of Cimicifuga, which is still dormant.

The wolverine [Mustela gulo L.; Gulo gulo (L.) today] will be asked for, but to find anyone competent to make a drawing which pleases Linnaeus will be difficult. Perhaps it is better to wait for Johannes Beckmann’sBeckman, Johannes (1739-1811).
German. Professor of economy,
Göttingen. After a two-year stay in
St Petersburg, he travelled in Sweden
and Denmark in 1765-1766. Correspondent
of Linnaeus.
return from Uppsala.

Falck sends his most humble greetings to Linnaeus’s wife [Sara Elisabet LinnaeaMoraea, Sara Elisabet
(1716-1806). Swedish. Linnaeus’s wife.
Daughter of Johan Moraeus and Elisabet
Hansdotter Moraea. Mother of Carl
Linnaeus the Younger and of Elisabeth
Christina, Louisa, Sara Christina and
Sophia Linnaea.
], the young daughters

Some time ago Johan Peter FalckFalck, Johan Peter (1732-1774).
Swedish. Professor of botany and
curator of the botanical garden of St
Petersburg. Correspondent of Linnaeus.
had the honour to address a letter to Linnaeus [27 January 1766Letter L3695], which he hopes has arrived safely. In that letter Falck had humbly asked for seeds of plants that might flourish in the open. The more rare and tender plants are too hazardous to try as the gardener is a little too careless to rely on.

Falck hopes that the enclosed seeds from their common friend in Siberia will please Linnaeus. He stresses that the seeds are not from him.

The other seeds enclosed, from Statice speciosa, are rather old, although less than two years.

Falck has now got plenty of the woolly seeds and also some of its vegetative parts, and this more complete material is enclosed for Linnaeus as a complement to the previous delivery. He asks if it could be anything else but Anemone sylvestris. Apart from these samples nothing has arrived from his Commissioners. Perhaps they are reluctant because it is not part of their official duties.

Falck sends his most humble greetings to Linnaeus’s wife [Sara Elisabet LinnaeaMoraea, Sara Elisabet
(1716-1806). Swedish. Linnaeus’s wife.
Daughter of Johan Moraeus and Elisabet
Hansdotter Moraea. Mother of Carl
Linnaeus the Younger and of Elisabeth
Christina, Louisa, Sara Christina and
Sophia Linnaea.
], his most helpful benefactor, the young daughters [Elisabeth Christina LinnaeaLinnaea, Sara Christina
(1751-1835). Swedish. Daughter of Carl
Linnaeus and Sara Elisabet Linnaea.
Sister of Carl Linnaeus the Younger and
of Elisabeth Christina, Louisa and
Sophia Linnaea.
, Louisa LinnaeaLinnaea, Louisa (1749-1839).
Swedish. Daughter of Carl Linnaeus and
Sara Elisabet Linnaea. Sister of Carl
Linnaeus the Younger and of Elisabeth
Christina, Sara Christina and Sophia
Linnaea.
, Sara Christina LinnaeaLinnaea, Sara Christina
(1751-1835). Swedish. Daughter of Carl
Linnaeus and Sara Elisabet Linnaea.
Sister of Carl Linnaeus the Younger and
of Elisabeth Christina, Louisa and
Sophia Linnaea.
, Sophia LinnaeaLinnaea, Sophia (1757-1830).
Swedish. Daughter of Carl Linnaeus and
Sara Elisabet Linnaea. Sister of Carl
Linnaeus the Younger and of Elisabeth
Christina, Louisa and Sara Christina
Linnaea. Wife of Samuel Christoffer
Duse.
] and to Linnaeus.

P.S. By the next delivery he may be able to enclose some rare plantlets from arctic Asia. He has been told that the stones [“seeds”] of Prunus Sibirica or Johann Amman’sAmman, Johann (1707-1741).
Swiss/Russian?. Curator of Hans Sloane’s
natural history collection. Professor of
botany at the Imperial Academy of
Sciences at St Petersburg. Correspondent
of Linnaeus.
Armeniaca betulae folio will arrive. It would please Falck if, finally, something will be delivered after all his work. If something interesting appears among the plants [in the Uppsala University Garden], he hopes Linnaeus will keep him in mind.

upMANUSCRIPTS

a. (LS, IV, 130-131). [1] [2] [3]

upEDITIONS

1. Bref och skrifvelser (1912), vol. I:6, p. 57-58   p.57  p.58.