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Link: linnaeus.c18.net/Letter/L3819 • Erik Fernow to Carl Linnaeus, 27 November 1766 n.s.
Dated 27 Nov. 1766. Sent from Gunnarskog (Sweden) to Uppsala (Sweden). Written in Swedish.

upSUMMARY

Erik FernowFernow, Erik (1735-1791).
Swedish. Clergyman from the province of
Värmland. His local history
collection is preserved as the Archivum
Wermelandicum. Correspondent of
Linnaeus.
explains that never-ending travelling through two extensive parishes have hitherto prevented him from thanking Linnaeus for replying to his previous letter [this letter has not come down to us].

As Fernow is busy, he writes the letter on a paper available where he is when writing.

When visiting Crispin LöwenhielmLöwenhielm, Crispin
(1739-1809). Swedish. Courtier, foundry
proprietor.
at his home Salbo, Fernow had observed a remarkable animal similar to a cat. Löwenhjelm told him that it was a lynx [Fernow names it “cat-lynx”, which Linnaeus in Fauna SvecicaLinnaeus, Carl Fauna Svecica
sistens animalia Sveciae regni:
quadrupedia, aves, amphibia, pisces,
insecta, vermes, distributa per classes
& ordines, genera & species. Cum
differentiis specierum, synonymis
autorum, nominibus incolarum, locis
habitationum, descriptionibus
insectorum
(Stockholm, 1746).
Soulsby no. 1151.
(including the second edition, Fauna Svecica, 2nd editionLinnaeus, Carl Fauna Svecica
sistens animalia Sveciae regni:
quadrupedia, aves, amphibia, pisces,
insecta, vermes, distributa per classes
& ordines, genera & species. Cum
differentiis specierum, synonymis
autorum, nominibus incolarum, locis
habitationum, descriptionibus
insectorum, 2nd edition
(Stockholm,
1761). Soulsby no. 1153.
) counts as a separat species although without giving it a name, since he had never seen it] that peasants had caught in a trap in the forest. Since Fernow had tried for four years to find a lynx while working in Bergslagen, he felt more delighted than if he had been promised a fortune. He was also told that a lynx cub was kept in chains at a nearby farm. Unfortunately the animal died before Fernow got an opportunity to see it, and the remains had been thrown away. When the lynx living at the Löwenhielm estate later was killed, its hide and bones were given to Fernow, who carefully describes the remnants in the letter. He promises to send them to Linnaeus.

Fernow tells the stories about lynxes he heard during his childhood in Värmland, and he describes the differences between the four kinds of lynxes, that the hunters in this part of the country distinguish, namely two kinds of “wolf-lynx”, the “fox-lynx” and the “cat-lynx”. The one he will send Linnaeus shall have been a “cat-lynx”.

Fernow also gives the local names for Linnaea, and he tells that a decoction of this plant with good effect is used as a cure for children’s eczema. Fernow reminds Linnaeus that he in his description of the Wäst-göta-resaLinnaeus, Carl
Wäst-göta-resa på
riksens högloflige ständers
befallning förrättad år
1746. Med anmärkningar uti
oeconomien, naturkunnogheten,
antiquiteter, inwånarnes seder och
lefnads-sätt
(Stockholm 1747).
mentioned that Linnaea makes a reliable cure for different aches and gout. Fernow has with extraordinary effect used Linnaea as a for people who during long time had been confined to bed because of ache, but who were now free from pain.

Last summer he had picked up from a “lecherous farmhand” that Gentianella boiled in wine could make an effective cure for stitch. Fernow had with good effect used that cure when on sick calls in his parish..

upMANUSCRIPTS

a. (LS, IV, 174-183). [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [15]

upEDITIONS

1. Bref och skrifvelser (1912), vol. I:6, p. 92-97   p.92  p.93  p.94  p.95  p.96  p.97.