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C18

Link: linnaeus.c18.net/Letter/L4331 • Carl Linnaeus to Domenico Vandelli, 7 January 1770 n.s.
Dated 1770. d. 7. Januarii.. Sent from Uppsala (Sweden) to (). Written in Latin.

upSUMMARY

Linnaeus has not heard from Domenico VandelliVandelli, Domenico (1735-1816).
Italian. Physician and botanist. Left
for Portugal in 1764, where he was a
professor at the university of Coimbra.
He was the founder of Ajuda botanical
garden in Lisboa and of the Coimbra
botanical garden, where he was also the
first director (1773-1791).
Correspondent of Linnaeus.
for a long time and wants news.

Linnaeus has been disturbed by his age, his bad health and his official duties.

Especially, Linnaeus wants to hear how far Vandelli’s work on the flora has progressed [Linnaeus refers to Vandellis work with the Florae lusitanicae et brasiliensis specimenVandelli, Domenico Florae
lusitanicae et brasiliensis specimen et
epistolae ab eruditis viris Carolo a
Linné, Antonio De Haen ad
Dominicum Vandelli scriptae
(Coimbra
1788).
]. Vandelli is the only one to know that. Linnaeus asks if anything has been published yet or when it is to be expected.

Linnaeus has published his second Mantissa [Linnaeus refers to the Mantissa plantarum altera, 2nd ed. Linnaeus, Carl Mantissa
plantarum altera
(1766), 2nd ed.
(Stockholm 1771). Soulsby no. 312.
published in 1771] with Sisymbium parra, the seeds of which were supplied by Vandelli.

Linnaeus gives a list of the whereabouts of his disciples: Anders SparrmanSparrman, Anders (1748-1820).
Swedish. Naturalist, physician and
traveller. Disciple of Linnaeus. In 1765
he went on a voyage to China and in 1772
to the Cape of Good Hope, where he
served as a tutor. Later the same year,
Sparrman went on James Cook´s
second voyage as assistant naturalist to
Johann Reinhold Forster and his son
Johan Georg Adam Forster. After his
return to Sweden in 1776 he was
appointed keeper of the natural
historical collections of the Royal
Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1780. In
1787 he participated in an expedition to
West Africa. Practicing physician in
Stockholm. Author of several works, the
best known of which is his account of
his travels in South Africa and with
Cook. Son of Brita and Eric Sparrman.
Correspondent of Linnaeus.
is in the Cape of Good Hope region Carl Peter ThunbergThunberg, Carl Peter
(1743-1828). Swedish. Botanist,
physician, explorer. Professor of
medicine and botany at Uppsala. Studied
medicine under Linnaeus in Uppsala,
medicine and surgery in Paris, natural
history under Johannes Burman in
Amsterdam. Travelled in South Africa in
1772-1775, in Japan 1775-1776, Java and
Ceylon in 1777-1778. Correspondent of
Linnaeus.
is in Japan, Daniel SolanderSolander, Daniel (1733-1782).
Swedish. Naturalist, explorer. Student
in Uppsala under Linnaeus and Johan
Gottschalk Wallerius. Went to London in
1760. Curator of natural history
collections at the British Museum.
Botanist on Cook’s first voyage
1768-1771. Joseph Bank’s librarian.
Correspondent of Linnaeus.
, Gadnius [presumably Henrik GahnGahn, Henrik (1747-1816).
Swedish. Physician. Linnaeus’s student.
Founder of the Swedish Society of
Medical Sciences in 1807. Correspondent
of Linnaeus. Son of hans Jacob Gahn and
brother of Hans Jacob Gahn the Younger.
, who later rejected the proposal made by Joseph BanksBanks, Joseph (1743-1820).
British. Naturalist, president of the
Royal Society. Together with Daniel
Solander he took part in Cook’s first
voyage. Correspondent of Linnaeus.
and Solander to join them on their intended second voyage and never visited Australia] and Bertinus [Anders BerlinBerlin, Andreas (1746-1773).
Swedish. Botanist. Linnaeus’s student
1765-1766. Secretary of Joseph Banks
1770-1773. Died in Delos, Guinea.
Correspondent of Linnaeus.
, who travelled to Guinea] visit the new Australian continent. Gmelin the Younger [Samuel Gottlieb GmelinGmelin, Samuel Gottlieb
(1745-1774). German. Professor of
botany at the Imperial Academy of
Sciences in St Petersburg. In 1764 he
travelled in Eastern Russia and the
provinces south of the Caspian sea. He
completed the Flora Sibirica
(1747-1769) of his uncle Johann Georg
Gmelin. Correspondent of Linnaeus.
] is in Persia, Peter Simon PallasPallas, Peter Simon
(1741-1811). German. Naturalist and
explorer. Pallas studied at the
universities of Göttingen and
Leiden. In 1768 he was called to Russia
to take part in an expedition to
Siberia, the aim of which was to study
the passage of Venus. Pallas remained in
Russia for the greater part of his life.
Correspondent of Linnaeus.
is in Tartaria, José Celestino MútisMútis, José Celestino
(1732-1808). Spanish. Botanist.
Went to South America in 1760 and lived
in Bogotá, which due to him
became an important centre of learning.
His comprehensive herbarium, manuscripts
and numerous watercolour botanical
illustrations were sent to Spain after
his death. Correspondent of Linnaeus.
is in Mexico, Johan Gerhard KönigKönig, Johan Gerhard
(1728-1785). Danish. Physician, born in
Polish Livonia. Private pupil of
Linnaeus in 1757. Visited Iceland. Went
to Tranquebar in India, to Thailand and
Ceylon. He died on his way to Tibet.
Correspondent of Linnaeus.
is in Tranquebar.

Pehr Forsskål’sForsskål, Peter
(1732-1763). Swedish. Naturalist and
explorer. Linnaeus’s student, professor
in Denmark in 1759. Joined a Danish
expedition to Egypt and Arabia in 1761.
Died at Jerîm, Arabia.
Correspondent of Linnaeus.
work on the Arabic plants [Flora aegyptica-arabicaForsskål, Peter Flora
aegyptica-arabica sive descriptiones
plantarum, quas per Aegyptum inferiorem
et Arabiam felicem detexit, illustravit
Petrus Forskål
, ed. Carsten
Niebuhr (Copenhagen, 1775).
], and Daniel Rolanders’Rolander, Daniel (1725-1793).
Swedish. Naturalist and explorer.
Studied at Uppsala University under
Linnaeus. Went to Surinam in 1755-1756.
Correspondent of Linnaeus.
on the plants of Surinam, are ready to be printed [nothing came out of this]. Nicolaus Joseph, baron von JacquinJacquin, Nicolaus Joseph, baron von
(1727-1817). Dutch. Botanist. In
1755 at the order of emperor Franz I of
Austria he went to the Antilles and
South America. In 1763 he became
professor of mineralogy and chemistry at
Chemnitz, later professor of botany at
Vienna and director of the botanical
garden at Schönbrunn. Correspondent
of Linnaeus.
is publishing an illustrated work on the plants of the botanical garden in Vienna [Linnaeus refers to the Hortus botanicus VindobonensisJacquin, Nicolaus Joseph, baron von
Hortus botanicus Vindobonensis :
seu plantarum rariorum quae in horto
botanico Vindobonensi coluntur icones
coloratae et succinctae
descriptiones
, I-III (Vienna
1770-1776).
] and on the rare plants of Austria [Linnaeus refers to Jacquin’s planned work Florae Austriacae, sive plantarum selectarumJacquin, Nicolaus Joseph, baron von
Florae Austriacae, sive
plantarum selectarum in Austriae A.
chiducatu sponte crescentium icones,
etc
(Vienna 1773-1778).
].

upEDITIONS

1. Florae lusitanicae et brasiliensis specimen (1788), p. 89-90 .